Home > Macro/Monetary Theory > Some Graphs

Some Graphs

In my last post, I put forth a model which leads to the crackpot conclusion that central banks, doing what they do, necessarily lead us into a “liquidity” trap unless there is some significant, and ever-increasing, leakage of money which is not backed by debt back into the economy (in other words “fiscal policy”).  I didn’t say very much about fiscal policy, there is a lot of work left to do which I intend to be doing for a while.  But at this point, just in case you are thinking that this theory is nutty, here are some graphs.

Quick history for the uninitiated.  The U.S. went off the (international) gold standard in 1971.  Then there was a decade of “stagflation” where inflation was high and, to put it (overly) simply, the Fed’s policy goals were not all that clear and people were still trying to figure out what was going on and what it meant in the long-run.  Then Paul Volcker was appointed chair of the Fed and vowed to rein in inflation which he did.  Since then, it has been supposed by many that the Fed has essentially been following a de facto inflation target.  The following graphs go from August 1979 (when Volcker was appointed) until the present.  We all know basically what output and the price level have done, so let’s cut to the chase.

Fed Funds Rate

fed funds rate

Ten-Year Yield

ten year yield

Now total debt is a little tricky.  Here is loans and leases in bank credit; all commercial banks, and the M2 money stock.

Loans and leases in bank credit, all commercial banks

 

m2

Notice that the ratio of M2 to total bank credit is about 1.74 in Nov. 1980 (this is as far back as the M2 series goes) and about 1.10 in Nov 2007.  Obviously, we know what happened next, and bank credit fell bringing the ratio back down to about 1.47 currently.  But of course, we also know what else happened….

“Fiscal Policy”

Federal debt held by fed banks

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  1. November 9, 2014 at 12:15 am

    Wonderful content, thank You !!

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